checklist

The Home-Selling Checklist

Before selling your home, you’ll want to make sure it is ready to be seen by potential buyers. Follow the next five steps to ensure that your house sells for the maximum value.

First Step: Paint

First, make sure that the paint is up to date. You may need to skim coat your walls. Skim coat, also called mud, is a thin layer of seam compound that can be used to repair or smooth damaged walls. You may need a skim jacket if you want to repair cracks, fill in joints, or flatten the area with an existing flat surface. Use a spatula or drywall knife to lay a layer of skim coat on rough walls or ceilings to form a flat surface for painting or wallpaper. Usually, two to four layers need to be applied before the surface is smooth. Examine the walls and ceiling for damage. If there is a lot of damage (notches, cracks, large holes), you have to fix them first. You may only need to complete the connection between the new plasters, maybe you have to complete the broken plaster or plaster-gypsum board joints, or you have many years of settlement or vibration Plan to repair plaster that will begin to break down.

Skim coating is a texturing technique used to smooth walls. Drywallers use this technique to hide imperfect taping work and give the wall only a plaster-like appearance and the smoothest surface. Non-oiling coatings are the only way to achieve class 5 drywall completion and many industry groups, including painting contractors, recommend them.

Second Step: Repairs

Some of these tips are quite simple, while others may need more elbow grease. But once the buyers have begun to show up at your location, you will benefit. When you are ready to sell, check your home for damaged parts, broken equipment, and spaces that need cleaning or exhilaration. Our home maintenance checklist will guide you through common home repairs that may affect your family's value, especially when you are examining each area. Taking an assessment can also help you decide what needs to be corrected. The total cost of repair depends on the condition of your home. Once you have listed the repairs you need, decide for yourself what you can do and where you need expert help. Compare quotes from multiple contractors so that you can consider the price range. Look at the whole house and consider if you need to make some improvements.

Third Step: Check the Foundation

Concrete is essentially a very porous material. It absorbs moisture naturally. Cracks in the concrete floor are completely expected and not a structural problem, but be sure to check the foundation with a specialist.

Fourth Step: Landscaping

Be sure that your yard looks good. Hire a professional to keep everything neatly trimmed. This includes mowing the lawn and keeping shrubs and trees manageable. Also, be sure to clean off your patio.

Fifth Step: Cleaning

Finish by sweeping, mopping, and dusting the whole house clean. This includes making sure that there are no signs of dirt or stains. Countertops, sinks, showers and toilets are the main places to keep clean. Roll up your sleeves and go to work. Save some money by using homemade cleaning products

Next, plant the “for sale’ sign in your front yard and discuss with your realtor. Then, you’ll be all set to start showing your property.

 Copyright © 2019 Realty Times. All Rights Reserved.

Your "Moving Into A New House" Checklist

You're finally in escrow, packing up your stuff to move it into the home of your dreams, and the excitement is palpable. But before you step foot in your new house, there are a few important things you should take care of.

1. Change your address

You'll have to stop into your local post office or visit the United States Postal Service's website to change your address at some point. Doing it early ensures that your mail will make as smooth a transition as you do. A side benefit to changing your address is the coupon package that comes with the form. That 10% off Lowe's discount will surely come in handy in a new home.

2. Update your contact info

Change your address online with creditors, financial institutions, schools, publications, and anyone else that is important. Your change of address form from the post office will forward your mail but going right to the source will ensure your new address is on file.

3. Tell your mailman and say "Thank you"

A little consideration goes a long way when it comes to forwarding mail.

4. Change the locks

How many of us have moved into a new place and used the same locks and keys that were provided to us?

"You really don't know who else has keys to your home," said HouseLogic. "That ensures you're the only person who has access. Install new deadbolts yourself for as little as $10 per lock, or call a locksmith — if you supply the new locks, they typically charge about $20-$30 per lock for labor.

5. Get the house deep cleaned

The previous occupants probably cleaned the house or had it cleaned when they left. But is it up to your standards? Get a crew in there before you move in. It'll be money well spent.

Make sure the crew also gets inside the closets, cabinets, and drawers. You don't want to start your new life with someone else's crumbs and dust bunnies.

6. Clean the carpets too

This is another area where you will probably want to focus a little energy—unless you're a fan of "germ hotspots," said Huffington Post. The blog reported that carpets are "botanical and zoological parks…that can be 4,000 times dirtier than your toilet seat," said microbiologist Dr. Philip Tierno, according to Men's Health. Let that set in for a moment.

7. Call an exterminator

Nothing ruins your first night in a new house like critters scurrying across the floor.

8. Research utilities

The current providers might be the best (or only) options...but they may not be. Deregulation in some areas means competitive rates for utilities that can pay off for you. Be sure to ask about any new user discounts for cable or satellite, and, also for bundling packages that might be available.

9. Shut off the utilities on the house you're moving from

Sounds like a given, but it's one of the most common errors people make when moving—an error that can turn out to be costly when you're paying double utilities.

10. Alert your service providers

Let your gardener and anyone else that services your home regularly know you are moving early on. Details like this can be easily overlooked during a move, and giving ample notice will allow them time to try to replace the business if you're moving out of their service area.

11. Pare down your stuff

The only thing worse that having boxes of stuff you don't use and don't need crowding your space is carting them from house to house. Days disappear quickly when you're packing and preparing to move. If you are at all concerned you won't have time for a garage sale or even to drive to the local donation spot, take advantage of charities that will come to your house and do a pick up. Then all you have to do is haul the stuff to the front porch and bring in your tax receipt once they're done.

Copyright © 2019 Realty Times. All Rights Reserved.